MEC Design Mercedes-Benz S63 AMG front 3/4 view

MEC Design Mercedes-Benz S63 AMG is a Big Black Throwback

MEC Design Mercedes-Benz S63 AMG front 3/4 view

For much of the 1980s, the W126-chassis Mercedes-Benz S-Class was one of the best telltales of financial success. Whether you were a music video director, the head of a development company erecting and selling McMansions by the hundreds, a junk bond peddler, a South Beach blow kingpin or a person working in some other lucrative-if-not-legitimate trade, one of your first stops after hitting it big was the local Mercedes-Benz dealer to plunk down the big bucks for one of these timelessly-beautiful Bruno Sacco-designed barges. And if you really wanted to make a statement, you installed a set of aftermarket wheels, often from Centra or still-independent-at-the-time AMG (and usually that’s all you did to the exterior; period owners didn’t fit huge hoops or dramatically drop the ride height like Inden Design did).

MEC Design Mercedes-Benz S63 AMG side view

These days, though, AMG is a part of Mercedes-Benz, and builds hot rod versions of the latest W222 S-Class like the S63 AMG. So it was only natural that the gang at MEC Design would fit a new S63 with a set of 22” wheels whose design is inspired by the iconic AMG “Monoblock” wheel. MEC Design calls it the mecxtreme1, and in this particular application, the centers are painted black to match the car’s body.

MEC Design Mercedes-Benz S63 AMG rear 3/4 view

Additionally, certain trim parts have been refinished in black and the trunk has been shorn of model designation badges, the latter a modification that has been popular since at least the days of the W126. Plus the suspension control module has been replaced to allow a lower ride height. It may to be retro in the strictest sense of the term, but combining the shapely new S-Class (which, in our not-always-humble opinion, is the best-looking one since the W126) with a classic wheel design creates a luxury sedan that nevertheless manages to pop our collar and get the Jan Hammer playing in our cranium.

Source: MEC Design



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